In Yellowstone

The lake is large, windy, and all boaters are recommended to stay close to shore as afternoon thunder-lightning storms can appear with little warning.

The lake is large, windy, and all boaters are recommended to stay close to shore as afternoon thunder-lightning storms can appear with little warning.

The Fishing Bridge area of Yellowstone is where the river flows into the lake. Most of the scenery is pristine wilderness as it has been protected to retain its natural state since 1872. The whole National Park is awe inspiring even to  visitors like Ed and I who (the first day) felt it reminded us of places we had been before. This made us feel we were on a quest to observe and experience the unique to Yellowstone wonders.

Looking East to the lake.

Looking East to the lake.

We camped for five days within the center of the caldera at the only park with full RV hook-ups.  Only hard sided campers are allowed and there are no picnic areas as cooking and eating outside are discouraged. Grizzlies often traverse through the camp sites on their way to the lake and a grizzly cub was spotted one morning, but we didn’t see it.

The elevation of Yellowstone is 8,600 feet and a few of us had issues with the altitude, shortness of breath and headache, that first day.  But the altitude mainly affected our water filtering pitcher. Though it was a fresh filter it seemed to be clogged. Ten cups of water is usually ready to drink within a half hour but at high altitude the same amount of water took hours to filter. I’m sure someone can explain the science behind it but it was a mystery to us that was only proven when we returned closer to sea level on the way home, and the filter worked just fine.

There's a protected walking lane with benches on the bridge - but fishing is no longer allowed.

There’s a protected walking lane with benches on the bridge – but fishing is no longer allowed.

Part of the fascination for us about staying at Fishing Bridge was knowing we were camping in a caldera of an active volcano. We could see vent plumes along the lake, near the side of the roads, and even in the center of a parking lot. This was fenced but easy enough to look down the steaming crater that used to be a paved parking spot.  Another reminder that Yellowstone is a unique location is because sometimes we felt a gentle rolling under the surface, and not just at Firehole Lake. This wasn’t like feeling an earthquake but more like going in slow motion over a long speed bump.

This bison pair eyed us closely as they passed in the other lane on the bridge.

This bison pair eyed us closely as they passed in the other lane on the bridge.

We see lots of wildlife during our normal life activities but we saw lots more bison than wanted (one was charging around too close for comfort) and Arkkade gets highly excited when near cows. Bison trigger the same reaction with her. On our final night, we waited on the bridge with all our windows closed as those big smelly cattle crossed the bridge next to us.

There are many pristine vistas and delicate wildlife so it's easy to forget there is a volatile caldera beneath the surface.

There are many pristine vistas and delicate wildlife so it’s easy to forget there is a volatile caldera beneath the surface.

We didn’t see any elk, wolf or bear so we don’t know what her reaction would be then. And that’s fine with me.

Waterfalls appeared at the side of the road and in steep canyons.

Waterfalls appeared at the side of the road and in steep canyons.

I am truly grateful to have had this experience in Yellowstone because as awesome as pictures and images of the park may be, the experience is greater. In my next post I’ll present some of our hot spring and geyser photos because those are what made this trip unique!

About Terri Patrick
Writer of Romance and Memoir. Life is an adventure, take that journey.

3 Responses to In Yellowstone

  1. Rose L. says:

    I have seen bison, elk, deer, squirrels and grizzlies when I have been there!

    Like

  2. Trish says:

    These photos are great and really give a sense of the beauty of the place!

    Like

  3. Looks wonderful, my sort of place, yet somewhere else to add to my (long) list. Interesting photos.

    Like

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